A Question For YOU

What made you a Matthew Ebel fan? (Assuming you are one. If not, grab some free songs and tell me what you think.) It’s not always easy to quantify, but I’d like you to try. It may not even be my music that brought you here.

I know what made me a Ben Folds fan- His ability to produce amazing sounds with only a few instruments just seemed brilliant. Even the album he made for Shatner sounded great.

I know what made me a Henry Rollins fan- NOT his music. Seriously. His spoken word stuff is amazing; it should all be called “Tales of a Man Who Abhors Bullshit.”

I know what made me an Amanda Palmer fan- Her ability to parlay mediocre label support into a self-sustaining music career is inspiring for those of us trying to skip the label step entirely. She’s anything but Top 40 material and yet has a following that just won’t quit.

So what made you a fan of ME? What is it about me or my music that made you support me?

  • It’s variety that really makes me a fan of yours. The fact that all of your songs sound unique and awesome. Most music that comes out these days sounds exatly the same, but your stuff is always new, fresh and exciting. 

  • It’s variety that really makes me a fan of yours. The fact that all of your songs sound unique and awesome. Most music that comes out these days sounds exatly the same, but your stuff is always new, fresh and exciting. 

  • The themes in your music of ground-level, every-day life mingled with the occasional fantastical or comedic elements brings together both the geeky and political activist sides of my personality in one place. Knowing that you are involved in fandom -be it general SF or furry- gives an extra dimension to your music:  here’s a guy who’s “one of us”. While the latter doesn’t change your lyrics or talent, it puts a perspective on things that adds a degree of fun to it all.  Finally, your ability to make the keys of your piano just sing with great rhythm and melody make me want to listen to any song you produce. Such a singular instrument cuts through the overall cloud of music in the world with its simplicity, engaging me on a more fundamental level than it would if there were many other instruments involved. This is what makes me a Matthew Ebel fan.

  • A.J.

     Your interaction with accident hash’s CC made me a fan of yours. You backed it up with great music, like that on “Beer & Coffee”.

  • Liz

    “Drive Away,” initially (yes, I’m one of THOSE fans), and that whole album. But it was High Orbit that made me keep listening and watching for your work. I always appreciated your sense of humor on that show – very sharp, but never mean, not really. That’s an unusual balance these days.

    Musically I love the variety and consistency. Your songs can make me cry (yes, really), and then laugh moments later. I love the collections you’ve been putting out – but I’ll mention that “Goodbye Planet Earth” is one of my favorite albums ever by any artist. It’s an extraordinary piece of work. (Which is also why I support you – given some of the garbage coming out of the major record labels, I’d love to see your business model keep working.)

    Also, my daughter loves your stuff as well, so I’m pretty much stuck with you until she leaves the house (in 11 years or so). Yes, you have a multi-generational fan base.

  • Liz

    “Drive Away,” initially (yes, I’m one of THOSE fans), and that whole album. But it was High Orbit that made me keep listening and watching for your work. I always appreciated your sense of humor on that show – very sharp, but never mean, not really. That’s an unusual balance these days.

    Musically I love the variety and consistency. Your songs can make me cry (yes, really), and then laugh moments later. I love the collections you’ve been putting out – but I’ll mention that “Goodbye Planet Earth” is one of my favorite albums ever by any artist. It’s an extraordinary piece of work. (Which is also why I support you – given some of the garbage coming out of the major record labels, I’d love to see your business model keep working.)

    Also, my daughter loves your stuff as well, so I’m pretty much stuck with you until she leaves the house (in 11 years or so). Yes, you have a multi-generational fan base.

  • Elfasi

     Listening to your music being played on podcasts, in the early days when Adam Curry was new, got me hooked.  I can’t think of any podcasts right now that exposé new music in the same way though…

  • Elfasi

     Listening to your music being played on podcasts, in the early days when Adam Curry was new, got me hooked.  I can’t think of any podcasts right now that exposé new music in the same way though…

  • LogarthSheppy

    I first saw you at FWA 2009.  I thought you were pretty good but I figured with that talent you’d be some narcissistic ass, or at least, not want to deal with yet another fat fanboy furry.. so I never said hi or really engaged you in any manner.  I saw you at cons over the next year, enjoying your music each time.  But I had my own circle of friends and I could only imagine how many fanboys someone that played multiple cons had to deal with… so again I never engaged you in any manner.  It wasn’t until the summer of 2010 that you became more than just some guy to me.   You probably remember the look I gave you, that, sitting on the couch, tinkering on my netbook at a friends place, cause it was somewhere between shock and disbelief.  Over the rest of the summer, I hung out with that group of friends more and listened to music  and by Furfright I was a total fan.  So if anyone out there is a fan of Matt, or is curious, he’s a totally down to earth guy, very agreeable and easy to talk to, if you see him at a con, say hi and buy a CD.  He’s totally not one of those artists that will bite your head off because you dared to speak to them.

    PS: You totally inspired one of my New Years Resolutions.  I have always wanted to learn guitar beyond tab and I’ve always loved the way bass sounded.  Over the last few months I’ve been learning to play both.  How did you inspire me?  I dunno, seeing someone perform and really enjoy it was kinda the kick in the pants I needed to go out and start my own little musical adventure.

  • LogarthSheppy

    I first saw you at FWA 2009.  I thought you were pretty good but I figured with that talent you’d be some narcissistic ass, or at least, not want to deal with yet another fat fanboy furry.. so I never said hi or really engaged you in any manner.  I saw you at cons over the next year, enjoying your music each time.  But I had my own circle of friends and I could only imagine how many fanboys someone that played multiple cons had to deal with… so again I never engaged you in any manner.  It wasn’t until the summer of 2010 that you became more than just some guy to me.   You probably remember the look I gave you, that, sitting on the couch, tinkering on my netbook at a friends place, cause it was somewhere between shock and disbelief.  Over the rest of the summer, I hung out with that group of friends more and listened to music  and by Furfright I was a total fan.  So if anyone out there is a fan of Matt, or is curious, he’s a totally down to earth guy, very agreeable and easy to talk to, if you see him at a con, say hi and buy a CD.  He’s totally not one of those artists that will bite your head off because you dared to speak to them.

    PS: You totally inspired one of my New Years Resolutions.  I have always wanted to learn guitar beyond tab and I’ve always loved the way bass sounded.  Over the last few months I’ve been learning to play both.  How did you inspire me?  I dunno, seeing someone perform and really enjoy it was kinda the kick in the pants I needed to go out and start my own little musical adventure.

  • Theo Verseer

    I just decided to check out your stream when it was linked to on the front page of FA. Everything about it was great fun. Your music, your lyrics, your commentary and the conversation with the other fans in the chat. It was good enough for me, so I kept showing up.

  • Theo Verseer

    I just decided to check out your stream when it was linked to on the front page of FA. Everything about it was great fun. Your music, your lyrics, your commentary and the conversation with the other fans in the chat. It was good enough for me, so I kept showing up.

  • Jason Painter

    “Beer & Coffee”, specifically “Drive Away”. I heard it everywhere at the beginning of that magical time when iTunes first supported podcasts, but the association with CC Chapman on “Accident Hash” cemented my interest. You were, to my mind, at the forefront of a new era of artists being in control of their content and not needing a label, through this new, burgeoning social interaction. I heard you speak on podcasts. You had a website. Producers would play, then all the other primary producers would pick it up. I followed a number of music podcasts back then and you would be played in one after another. Saturation in a small pool of channels. Quite remarkable. It wouldn’t have worked, though, if the music had been bad, but of course it wasn’t. When I got the album, I discovered that beyond “Drive Away”, there were a wealth of gems, not just the one.

    So I love the music, but you’re also sentimentally linked to that extraordinary time when podcasts hit the mainstream, and that’s special to me.

  • Jason Painter

    “Beer & Coffee”, specifically “Drive Away”. I heard it everywhere at the beginning of that magical time when iTunes first supported podcasts, but the association with CC Chapman on “Accident Hash” cemented my interest. You were, to my mind, at the forefront of a new era of artists being in control of their content and not needing a label, through this new, burgeoning social interaction. I heard you speak on podcasts. You had a website. Producers would play, then all the other primary producers would pick it up. I followed a number of music podcasts back then and you would be played in one after another. Saturation in a small pool of channels. Quite remarkable. It wouldn’t have worked, though, if the music had been bad, but of course it wasn’t. When I got the album, I discovered that beyond “Drive Away”, there were a wealth of gems, not just the one.

    So I love the music, but you’re also sentimentally linked to that extraordinary time when podcasts hit the mainstream, and that’s special to me.

  • Susan Mellinger

    I heard your music on The Second Floor Lounge, which is put together by an old friend of mine. I think after he put the fourth song from you on his podcast, which is dedicated to finding new music and didn’t have a lot of artist repeats at the time, I really started paying attention. So I downloaded the 5 free songs, and I started watching your weekly UStream show, and I was hooked. 

    I’m a piano gal, so that didn’t hurt. But it was the clever lyrics and singable tunes that kept me listening. As someone else said, it’s also the fact that you can create songs that sound different from one another. Last but not least, you sound just as good live as you do on disc (if not better). This is a big deal for me.

  • LadyRowyn

    One of my friends from Furry gave me a copy of “In the MUCK”, and I thought “Wow, this guy is really good. Surely he’s done other songs.” I found “Beer and Coffee” on iTunes and was hooked. I love how polished and beautiful your music is.

  • LadyRowyn

    One of my friends from Furry gave me a copy of “In the MUCK”, and I thought “Wow, this guy is really good. Surely he’s done other songs.” I found “Beer and Coffee” on iTunes and was hooked. I love how polished and beautiful your music is.

  • michael

    I heard one of your songs (Drive Away maybe) on thesixtyone.com and that prompted me to buy Beer and Coffee and I liked every track of that album.  I could listen to Latte Days and Porter Nights on an endless loop.   I don’t know what it is but your songs just stick in my head (in a good way).

  • michael

    I heard one of your songs (Drive Away maybe) on thesixtyone.com and that prompted me to buy Beer and Coffee and I liked every track of that album.  I could listen to Latte Days and Porter Nights on an endless loop.   I don’t know what it is but your songs just stick in my head (in a good way).

  • Deuce Swift

    I saw you live at FAU four days ago, and one of the first things that made me a fan was your stage presence. You have a very strong personality, wonderful sense of humor and some damn fine skills with your instrument/tools. Excellent performer.
    As for the music, your lyrics are very sharp, (which as far as I’m concerned can be one of the hardest parts of songwriting), meaningful; humorous; poignant even. While on top of it all, your songs have a rhythm and tempo that keeps me from holding myself still, and harmony lines that force me to at least hum along.
    One hour and a half performance later, and you’ve got yourself another fan for life! You keep rocking, and you’ll always have at least one pair of ears listening.

  • Deuce Swift

    I saw you live at FAU four days ago, and one of the first things that made me a fan was your stage presence. You have a very strong personality, wonderful sense of humor and some damn fine skills with your instrument/tools. Excellent performer.
    As for the music, your lyrics are very sharp, (which as far as I’m concerned can be one of the hardest parts of songwriting), meaningful; humorous; poignant even. While on top of it all, your songs have a rhythm and tempo that keeps me from holding myself still, and harmony lines that force me to at least hum along.
    One hour and a half performance later, and you’ve got yourself another fan for life! You keep rocking, and you’ll always have at least one pair of ears listening.

  • Tim

    I heard “A Cautionary Tale” played on a podcast (“the Fredcast”, I believe it was).

The Democratically Elected Best of Matthew Ebel Join the Robot Army, get a FREE album!

* indicates required

Enlist Today!